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    04-07-2017 Red Bull, Kingsley

  • Report by :- David L on 2017-07-05 10:20:54
  • Detail :-

    CH3 – Tuesday 4th July 2017 - Run from car park opposite Kingsley Community Primary School and later at The Red Bull, Kingsley

    This is the first time that CH3 has visited The Red Bull, Kingsley; although the run started and finished at the car park opposite Kingsley Community Primary School Middle Lane, Kingsley. It was intended to use The Horseshoe in Kingsley after the run; but sadly it has joined a growing list of Hash pubs that have closed. However, we were welcomed at The Red Bull which is now the only pub in Kingsley. This is the second time this year that I’ve intended to run from a pub that has recently closed. Earlier this year I had intended to run from The Hazel Pear in Acton Bridge but instead we ran from The Holly Bush, Bartington. Fortunately, the Hazel Pear has subsequently reopened; maybe there is hope for The Horseshoe?

    There were 29 of us this evening including the welcome return of John & Karen Moorhouse after their work in supporting Sid’s cycling adventure across USA – well done to all of them. Maps were handed out before the “off” to show Hashers how to get to the pub after the run but maps were not required by the couple of Hashers who thought that the run was from the pub and had been waiting for us there. Perhaps in future they should read beyond the first line on the website!!

    This American Independence Day run was 5.75 miles, with 25 checks and 480 feet of ups and downs. In addition, there were three strategically placed check-backs and an impromptu muster to ensure that we kept everyone together. Roger Pidcock was my co-hare on this trail; we set the trail on the Friday immediately before the run. During setting, we went armed with secateurs and sticks to provide safe and easier passage for fellow Hashers – we took our time and eliminated quite a few brambles and nettles – Do you think anyone appreciated our hard work?!! ……. Nah!!

    El Presidente was not with us this week, and nor were a number of the dissidents; neither Allan nor Roger T were available so Hilary took responsibility for the group. It was decided that the Dissidents would follow roughly the same route as the main pack but incorporate a few short-cuts into their route without giving the game away about the way forward.

    We set off at 19:50 and turned left out of the car park along Middle Lane to the junction with the B5152 passing Depmore Lane on the left. At this five-way-check we chose to run along Waterloo Lane before turning right up Ofal Pit Lane just after Castlehill Cottage. After running uphill on Ofal Pit Lane, we tackled the long uphill slog up Meeting House Lane until we reached another five-way-check where we gathered before turning left. Turning left, we ignored Dobers Lane and Newton Hollow, running down the unnamed lane signposted to Alvanley and Helsby towards Waterloo Lane; until we turned right up Delamere Way, a footpath leading back to Dobers Lane. At this junction at the top of the footpath, we went north-east along Dobers Lane before turning right at Crow Mere passing Crowmere Cottage and then taking the footpath through the woods and emerging further along Dobers Lane where we turned right and then left along Top Road. We followed Top Road until we met two footpaths on the left, taking the one that eventually led us to Hazelhurst Road. We turned right onto Hazelhurst Road, passing Top Road on the right, to reach B5152 Kingsley Road. We crossed the road onto the footpath crossing a number of fields to Watery Lane where we turned left and, after a short run, right onto Bradley Lane. We followed Bradley Lane towards Beech Farm but turned right along the footpath which took us back to Watery Lane very close to where we were a few minutes earlier and enjoyed an impromptu muster. This time we turned left onto Watery Lane going in the opposite direction passing Brook Farm on the left and up the hill to a T junction where we turned left towards Hatley Farm. Shortly before reaching the farm we selected the footpath on the right which we followed over a couple of large fields (with the expanding Lady Heyes centre situated on our right) to reach another unnamed lane. At the lane we went straight across towards Peel Hall and followed the footpath along the farm track, across a field and through some woods to reach Pike Lane. At Pike Lane we turned right heading back towards the car park, crossing Hollow Lane and on on Home to Middle Lane.

    When I design a Hash route, I often work through a number of alternatives before I decide on a particular route; which I then check out before finalising it. Sometimes this route may have to be changed because what looks good on paper doesn’t work on the ground (much like the England football team!). This week my original proposed route took us along a footpath behind Newton Hall as we ran back towards the finish, but this pathway was not particularly well defined so I decided to take an easier option – that original way would have meant more ups and downs so maybe Hashers will be relieved.

    We arrived back at the car park at nine o’clock and were making our way down to the pub at about quarter past nine. It was Quiz Night at The Red Bull and we were crammed into a small side room so that we didn’t disturb the natives. Nevertheless it was an enjoyable post Hash get-together with some good beer and the obligatory chips.

    Another average Hash? – it was hillier with less checks than my usual designs but it was a decent run out (not too quick, not too slow), the pack stayed together, no one got lost or injured, we encountered a variety of territory with some pleasant views and we got back to the pub promptly.

    Yesterday was Jenny’s and my 46th wedding anniversary - we spent late afternoon / early evening on a Nature walk around Bickley Hall Farm, which is the home / HQ of Cheshire Wildlife Trust. Did you know that 99% of Cheshire’s meadows have been lost in the last 60 years? The Cheshire Wildlife Trust is trying to re-establish some of this meadowland. The loss of meadowland has had a devastating effect on bees, butterflies, small mammals and birds. After the Nature Walk, Mrs L and I enjoyed a meal at The Nags Head, Haughton – I made a note that I must organise a Hash from there again in the not too distant as it is a good location. El P asked me recently if I would set a Hash from the White Lion, Alvanley as there are some good Hashing options available from there. We have hashed ten times from that location, but not since 2004. I believe that I have set hashes from The White Lion on two occasions with Mike Murray – 27th May 1997 and 13th June 2000 (However, on the statistics I have only been credited with the 1997 trail!!). I will arrange another run from The White Lion in the not too distant – when this happens, I guess that actually it will be my THIRD trail set from there (or second according to the statistics!)

    Next week – It is the annual hash BBQ from Rob Stephenson’s house in Knutsford next Tuesday. As Rob says “Be there or be triangular”; please don’t be triangular.

    David Lever
    4th July 2017


    30-05-2017 Egerton Arms, Little Budworth

  • Report by :- David L on 2017-06-13 09:51:42
  • Detail :-

    CH3 Tuesday 30th May 2017
    Egerton Arms, Little Budworth

    Once again I am writing a report about a hash at which I was a Hare; no one else seems to write reports in this section anymore – maybe no one reads them! Perhaps reports have moved onto our Facebook pages. I’m afraid that I have opted out of social media; I don’t have a Facebook account and have never seen any of our pages. I hope that the website continues as this is my only concession to technology. Anyone who has seen my steam driven mobile phone would agree that much of this “modern stuff” is passing me by! I am enjoying my status as a modern day Luddite.

    Before the off we congratulated Ken Sutor on finishing 4th in the Dragons Back race - an incredible 5-day journey of 315 kilometres with 15,500 metres of ascent across wild, trackless, remote and mountainous terrain. We also congratulated Karen Moorhouse on reaching her 500th Hash – I remember Karen’s first Hash which was on 2nd June 1998 as it was one that I set with Mike Murray from The Crown, Tarporley and involved a trek through a cornfield where everyone got very wet. During our pre-run huddle, it was also reported by Dave Morris that hash markers around Davenham and Moulton had caused fear and apprehension amongst the natives, many of whom were concerned for their canine friends as they thought the marks may be the work of dog thieves. Many had taken to social media to express concern and had even involved the local constabulary who have been reassured by Dave that these are markers made by Hashers who are largely harmless! Our extended huddle meant that we were a little slow out of the blocks which meant that we wouldn’t be back by nine o’clock as I had hoped.

    When I visited the pub a week or so before I had spotted that The Egerton Arms, Little Budworth offered a 10% discount on beer to members of CAMRA. Colin Bodimeade who is a well-respected member of CAMRA approached the pub with his membership card BUT sadly they weren’t prepared to give us 10% off ALL our beer – just Colin’s!!

    Barry Chambers was my co-hare and he kindly looked after the rear. Barry and I had arranged to set the markers on the Saturday morning before the run. However, I had kept an eye on the weather forecast - this showed that the weather would be fine throughout the week, BUT we would be subjected to heavy rain on Saturday. Anyone who has ever tried to set a Hash during heavy rain knows that it ain’t a great idea; so I decided to go ahead and set the trail ahead of Saturday with some help from my wife, Jenny. On Saturday Barry and I ran the route again, with Barry looking out for our markers. As you will know, my markers are tied small and well tucked away. As we ran around, Barry couldn’t spot many of the markers on the “On On” way, so when they couldn’t be spotted we laid another couple. That meant that in many places there were FIVE markers – on the night in some places they still weren’t spotted!!

    The Hash run this evening was 6 miles with 36 checks and loads of ways. There was just 280 feet of ascent and descent on the route. In addition, there were four check-backs to keep everyone together which seemed to work OK.

    The weather forecast for the evening of the Hash was “sunny”, but as we arrived in Little Budworth it was raining a little and it didn’t look promising. However, as we set out the weather improved and it turned out that we had very pleasant conditions for a run.

    The route started with a 1.4 mile loop around Little Budworth back to the pub – turning left out of the pub car park and left again before taking the footpath on the right of Vicarage Road; running across the field to join the lane that circles around the east side of Oulton Park race track towards Home Farm. After a short run, we turned left off that lane and followed the footpath across the fields to Booth Avenue where we congregated; turning right onto Townfield Drive, then onto St Peter’s Drive and then turned left onto Vicarage Lane before heading back by the pub passing Pinfold Lane and Park Road. We turned right into Oulton Woods and headed through the trees towards the Little Budworth Country Park car park. At this point (and at our first seven way check) we ran north-west through the woods, parallel to Coach Road, to reach White Hall Lane. At this nine way check we crossed Coach Road and followed various woodland paths with lots of checks heading south-east and then north-west, north east then south west before crossing Coach Road again further towards the A49. We then followed various woodland paths until we emerged onto Beech Road where we left the Country Park – at this stage we had been running around the woods for 2.3 miles. At Beech Road we turned right and ran along that lane before turning right onto a footpath which took us to Brook Slack and then onto to White Hall Lane. We headed north up White Hall Lane taking the footpath on the right after Oak Tree Farm to join the lane which then took us down to Park Road. After gathering at that point, we turned right along Park Road and right again across the fields and back to White Hall Lane; and then it was a 0.6 mile run-in down a farm track back to Park Road and along Pinfold Lane to the pub.

    During the run we managed to meet up with the Dissidents seven times as we criss-crossed around Little Budworth – this didn’t quite match the record of eight times achieved at Tarporley e few weeks ago, but it was still a creditable achievement! However, we didn’t meet up with the walkers who arrived back at the pub a little after the Hash after their three mile circuit of the village. The Hash arrived back at the pub at just before ten past nine.

    The Egerton Arms, Little Budworth is a great proper pub in an excellent location with an excellent selection of good beers. I am told that the chips were good too. As usual, there was plenty of excellent craic at the après Hash, after what appeared to be a very average run.

    Dave Lever
    31st May 2017


    18-04-2017 Rising Sun, Tarporley

  • Report by :- David L on 2017-04-19 14:01:21
  • Detail :-

    CH3 – Rising Sun, Tarporley
    Tuesday 18th April 2017

    Sadly there aren’t so many Hash reports written these days recording the exploits of our intrepid Hashers on a Tuesday evening. Writing these reports is somewhat time-consuming and everyone has such busy lives these days. It is often quite difficult to find something different to say particularly if so many of the Hashes are “average”. If more people shared the burden we should get many different perspectives on the runs. Anyway, recently I decided to make the effort to write something following those hashes where I am the Hare (whether or not people are interested); so here I go again ……………

    As all trail layers know, it always pays to check-out the pub well before the Hash. I normally talk to the owner / manager a few weeks ahead of the Hash to make sure everything is OK; but this time I only checked The Rising Sun the week before. When we met, I was told that The Rising Sun is closing on Friday for three months, for what must be an extensive refurbishment. Luckily the Hash was this Tuesday and not next!!
    After our awful experience with the Chetwode Arms, Lower Whitley - I don’t wish to develop a bad reputation concerning the pubs I select. Recently I had planned a Hash from The Hazel Pear, Acton Bridge – fortunately I checked ahead of time, found that it had closed and arranged to run from the Holly Bush instead; so very few Hashers will be aware of that, until now. Many of us may recall the hash that Doctor Rob arranged from the pub that had closed – he was teased about that for ages – I am trying to avoid a similar fate.

    Rob Baddeley and I set the markers on the Sunday morning before the Hash. The weather forecast was heavy rain in the morning, clearing later in the afternoon; but we were lucky – it didn’t rain whilst we set the trail but it did rain quite hard after we finished and throughout the afternoon. I looked out of my window at home later and wondered what the heavy rain would be doing to our newly applied chalk and tissue. Any fears about markers being washed out were unfounded and the ground was good to firm. On the Sunday setting, as Rob and I came to the second check we spotted fresh Hash markers already applied. We just couldn’t understand it and thought that it might cause confusion on the Hash; we considered removing them but that wouldn’t be fair. Instead we applied our own markers alongside – we thought that we could explain the dual markings to the pack. Our second check was four ways (or more) but the rogue hashers had only marked it as “two” – so they are obviously just beginners. The rogue hash continued throughout our first four checks but then it appeared to have gone a different way and we didn’t encounter any further rogue markings. Ian Blakebrough told me that he had spotted rogue hash markings elsewhere. Perhaps we need to search out these imposters.

    The trail was 5½ miles with 35+ checks and we were never that far from the pub as we made our way around Tarporley with a series of loops and my usual degree of “deviousness”. There were some short sections and a few longer sections where we had incorporated some check-backs / musters to keep everyone together. According to Mapmyrun there was approximately 420 foot of ascent and descent on the route. As usual on our runs the check marks are quite close to the junction. This approach should encourage more people to check, as Hashers don’t get too far behind when they get them wrong. In this run, no second markers were further than one hundred metres away and many were much closer. The weather was fine, not cold but a slight chill in the air. The terrain was not particularly challenging.
    We started in the public car park some distance behind The Rising Sun. We ran up to The High Street to our first check where we turned right and then left along Park Road. On Park Road we turned left along a footpath opposite the hospital; and along that footpath, at the second opportunity, turned into the housing estate along Lime Close, before turning left onto Woodlands Way to Forest Road. Here we turned left and right (more or less straight on) onto another footpath taking us, past the relatively new Heatherways housing estate on the left, to a two way check which offered a left turn into the estate or a right turn along a footpath uphill heading towards Heath Green. We ran along Heatherways and emerged onto Utkinton Road where we turned left making our way to the junction with The High Street and Forest Road. We turned left along the High Street and immediately right along a footpath heading in a westerly direction to a gate at the end and into a field offering us two ways. We turned left across two fields and almost back to where we had started at the public car park behind The Rising Sun. No – that wasn’t the end of the run …….. We turned right across a couple of fields to Moor Lane where we turned right travelling north alongside (but away from) the A49 until we reached Rode Street. We continued, on the other side of Rode Street, on the footpath running parallel to the A49 to Utkinton Road; and then we continued on another footpath, on the other side of Utkinton Road, again running parallel to the A49, to Heath Green. At Heath Green we turned right and ran to the junction with Tarporley Road / Forest Road / Cobblers Cross Lane; we went straight across onto Cobblers Cross Lane before turning left into Portal Golf Club. We ran along various pathways through the Golf Club heading southwards and downwards before emerging onto Cobblers Cross Lane opposite Torr Rise. At this point we turned left along Cobblers Cross Lane, straight on to Walkers Lane before turning right onto Bowmere Road. As Bowmere Road met Eaton Road, we turned right until we got to Churchill Road where we turned left, left again and then right towards Oathills Drive; on Oathills Drive we turned left before taking the footpath on the right up towards Torr Rise. We followed Torr Rise back to Cobblers Cross Lane back to the point where we had emerged from the Golf Club. This time we turned left along Cobblers Cross Lane before turning left along the footpath which took us to Park Road, near the centre of Tarporley. At Park Road we turned left all the way around to The High Street, passing the Primary School on the left. At the High Street we turned right and ran back to the pub and then left back into the car park arriving back at the cars at just before nine o’clock. The hash ran at a reasonable pace without appearing to be too quick, allowing everyone to stay together. We didn’t dilly dally at the checks but moved on.

    The Dissidents followed a largely different route, which had been cunningly designed by El Presidente, that managed to meet up with the main hash no fewer than EIGHT times (largely going in the opposite direction). Allan Jones and I had been pleased with an earlier Hash in Tarporley where we had managed to meet up four times, but this effort exceeded all expectations and will be a very difficult target to beat. In addition, the main pack and the dissidents also managed to arrive “home” at exactly the same time.

    There were 38 awarded “ticks” at the Hash this evening, including Ralf Sandvoss who was visiting the UK and made a very welcome appearance. Only another twenty five visits to the UK and Ralf could reach one hundred hashes!

    The folk at the Rising Sun were very welcoming although chips were a little delayed – they probably didn’t expect us back into the pub quite so promptly. We should visit the Rising Sun again when it is reopened – there are lots of trail possibilities from there and it is a good pub with a spacious car park behind it. Anyway, I found tonight’s Hash was a very pleasant way to spend a Tuesday evening and hopefully everyone else found it incredibly average.


    14-03-2017 Holly Bush, Barnton

  • Report by :- David L on 2017-03-20 20:46:48
  • Detail :-

    CH3 Report – Holly Bush, Bartington – 14th March 2017

    A good turnout despite the absence of around a dozen regulars who were away skiing and participating in the Skash run in Val D'Isere. It was a pleasant evening – it was dry and it was mild – good running conditions. There were a number of late arrivals because of various holdups on the roads, including reports of a sinkhole which appeared on the A50, so we didn’t kick off until almost eight o’clock. Repair work on the swing bridge on the A49 just south of the Holly Bush, which meant that only one carriageway was open, was expected to cause some holdups; but in the event there wasn’t really any significant delay here – but you should avoid the area at peak times!!

    Tonight’s run was 5.7 miles with 29 checks and 250 feet of ascent and descent. The Hares were Dave Lever and Roger Pidcock, who had set the trail on the Sunday before.
    We set off by running right out of the pub along Smithy Lane, turned right down Willow Green Lane before turning left along the footpath, which followed the right edge of the fields, taking us back onto Smithy Lane. We followed footpaths straight across Smithy Lane and across the Runcorn Road (A533) to Heath Road. We turned right onto Heath Road and then left onto Ash House Lane; before turning right onto a footpath, shortly after passing Clatterwick Lane on the left. This footpath took us between the houses and over fields back to the Runcorn Road where, following a check-back and muster and we were all safely gathered together; we turned left and ran along the A533 before turning right onto Shutley Lane and into Little Leigh. In the centre of Little Leigh we turned left onto Brakeley Lane and back towards the Runcorn Road. We turned right along Runcorn Road and then right down Hole House Lane to the Trent & Mersey Canal where we turned sharp right and climbed up the footpath alongside Brakeley Rough to Church Road in Little Leigh. At this point we gathered again before turning left along Church Road which becomes Leigh Lane, shortly after passing St Michael & All Angels Church on the right. We turned left off Leigh Lane along a muddy track down to Willow Green Lane where we gathered once again before setting off along the Trent & Mersey Canal towards the A49 and continuing towards Bartington Hall Farm where we left the canal heading south back towards the A49 which we crossed onto the old Warrington road towards the Leigh Arms. Just before reaching Willow Green Lane we turned north along the footpath on the left taking us back to and then over the Trent & Mersey Canal and up the hill to the junction of Willow Green Lane and Leigh Lane; where we gathered once again before heading north up the lane and back to The Holly Bush. Enroute we did manage to cross paths with the Dissidents, but didn’t encounter the walkers.

    The pack stayed together fairly well and we got back to the pub at around nine o’clock (at about the same time as the Dissidents and the walkers) leaving plenty of time for the ample supply of chips and good beer. The Holly Bush were very welcoming and our group was allocated the Dining Room, as the evening diners had all gone and the bar was taken up with a folk singing group. The folk at the Holly Bush were excellent and we should endeavour to return here.

    On the whole, another fairly average evening.


    31-01-2017 Tigers Head, Pychleys Hollow

  • Report by :- David L on 2017-02-02 08:33:52
  • Detail :-

    CH3 Report – 31st January 2017 – Tiger’s Head, Norley
    The weather forecast this evening was not encouraging – heavy rain, wet and cold. I assume that this expectation was what caused our lower turnout. According to the stats, just 26 brave souls made it to the Tiger’s Head for the Hash. It was raining (but not as hard as predicted), it was fairly mild (certainly not as cold as predicted) and it was somewhat “soft” underfoot and it was very muddy. This was the 23rd occasion that we have run from The Tiger’s Head at Norley. You may ask, where is the Tiger’s Head? – it is four feet from its tail (according to Lonnie Donegan). Norley is an excellent location for setting hashes with many, many different trails possible and there is always uncertainty about which way we will go. It is also only five minutes away from my house. The run this evening was six miles with 31 clearly marked checks and four hundred and fifty feet of ups and downs (it seemed more!). The route was roughly 50% along lanes / roads and the rest across fields and along footpaths.

    Tonight was a special evening – it was the 1,400th Hash of the man who started it all, El Presidente Allan Jones. The Cheshire Hash was started by Allan in May 1982; and it is because of him that we turn up every Tuesday evening running across the Cheshire countryside in the dark, clutching our torches, in the freezing cold and the pouring rain through stagnant water, thick mud and other more unpleasant substances …….

    Rob Baddeley and I were the Hares for this evening, but Rob was unable to make it tonight as his father had been taken to hospital; so Stewart Bailey assumed the role of back-marker. In addition, Rob and I were unable to set the trail together, as he wasn’t available when I was and I wasn’t available when he was; so I set checks 16 to 31 on the Friday and Rob set checks 1 – 15 on the Sunday – it was entirely seamless, you just couldn’t see the join. When I set my bit of the hash, I did run the entire route; it was cold and frosty and fairly firm under foot BUT it was evident that it would be squelchy when it was milder, and so it was on the night!! Nevertheless, I can honestly say “It wasn’t as muddy as this when I set it”. Our original planned route was slightly different from the one that we actually set – it was proposed to go further down the Delamere Way before turning right, running across fields, passing Fieldhouse Farm and joining School Lane BUT a huge tree had fallen across the footpath onto a kissing gate. It was impassable and it was necessary to re-think the route on the hoof. It should be noted that there had been quite a bit of rain since we set the markers, so that much of the chalk had disappeared. I guess the tissue tucked in the hedges was still there, but very often Hashers can’t find them anyway!!

    We were a little delayed setting off as we waited for some last minute arrivals to get ready. We didn’t check at the front of the pub (as we normally do), we ran directly down the footpath that runs alongside the pub to the lane near Stanneybrook Farm, where we turned right heasing towards Marsh Lane and there we turned left. Along Marsh Lane, we turned right and made our way up the muddy Pingards Lane to the top where we turned left and headed to the junction with Bag Lane where we went straight across towards Delamere Park. We continued along Woods Lane until we reached a four way check at Beechwood Farm. We ran past the Day Nursery at the Farm, through the farm yard and across a field to a footpath where we took the option to the right towards Moss Lane; we turned right up Moss Lane to Bag Lane (ignoring Burgess Lane on the right) and at Bag Lane we turned left. We turned left off Bag Lane onto Cow Lane, taking us back to the other end of Moss Lane where we turned right towards Moss Farm. Before the farm we followed the footpath on the right up Yearsley Lane until we joined Finger Post Lane (the main Cuddington to Frodsham road). At the junction with Gallowsclough Lane and Hough Lane we unexpectedly (most chose the lleft or straight on option) turned right passing the school on the right and back towards the pub. However, it wasn’t time for a drink yet …. we turned left up Maddocks Hill, once again meeting the main Cuddington to Frodsham road where we turned right and immediately left along a footpath which becomes part of the Delamere Way. Turning right we headed off towards Post Office Lane. At this point we took a slight shortcut and turned left (rather than right and left and then left again) to the junction with School Lane where we dwelt at the five way check. We ran around Flaxmere in a clockwise direction before emerging once again at the junction of School Lane and Post Office Lane. This time we headed north-east along School Lane before turning right onto Crabmill Lane and then left onto Post Office Lane until we reached the junction with Norley Road. At that point we all gathered before running directly through the final two checks and running along Pytcheleys Hollow back to the pub by 21:10. The run should have been 6.2 miles; but I had shaved a little off so it was just six miles.

    On the run we managed to “bump into” the small group of Dissidents as they worked their way around a slightly different route in the opposite direction. Jenny Lever tells me that she and Helen Jackson enjoyed a long walk in the rain arriving back at the pub very wet indeed after quite a work-out, but we didn’t “bump into” them.

    Andy Hunt continued with his record of never missing a Hash, apart from work demands and holidays; but he was certainly very poorly sick with an unpleasant virus. He stubbornly ran the entire route despite being offered an early finish as we were near the pub half way round. Dedication indeed!

    Getting changed in the rain is never a joy and tonight was no exception; trying unsuccessfully to keep me and my fresh clothes dry under the tailgate of my car with a sea of mud under my feet. I guess everyone else suffered the same challenges. Back inside the pub Liverpool and Chelsea drew 1-1, there were plenty of chips available and the beer was excellent. The Tiger’s Head always make us welcome and make the evening pleasant for us – full marks to them.

    Next time it is raining, wet and cold and maybe it is also blowing a gale …… I hope that the “fair weather” Hashers will decide to join us too. It was fairly tough going through the mud BUT it was a lot of fun and we definitely felt that we had earned our drink at the end.

    Tomorrow is February. See y’all next Tuesday evening at The Big Lock, Middlewich.

    On On
    Old Dave


    03-01-2017 George Inn, Sandbach

  • Report by :- Allan J on 2017-01-08 20:35:41
  • Detail :-

    Xmas 2016 and beyond!

    “Why aren’t we in Northwich tonight, it’s a Cheshire Hash tradition?” a mildly irritated Hasher asked. T’was the Tuesday before Xmas and apparently that means we must return to the stable of the Penny Black in Northwich, where we can all be counted into this el cheapo Wetherspoons so Stewart can collect the inevitable surplus from the kitty, to ensure a financially bountiful 2017 for our little group.

    Well, traditions like New Year’s Resolutions (of which MUCH more later) can be broken. I will admit that it did occur to me in late Summer, that perhaps my self-imposed decision not to get involved in trail laying anymore, given my continued decline in speed, could be reconsidered for a one off 2016 Xmas special. I’ve laid this pre Xmas Hash with Martin Hack a few times over recent years, and it’s certainly possible to lay an intricate 5 and a bit mile trail round Northwich and its environs, with a sufficient number of checks to enable me to cling onto the rear of the pack.

    So I thought I’d go for it, and went on the Hash website to find that Nicky had already put her name down for this Tuesday. Then I vaguely remembered that she’d said something soon after she shattered her ankle, about setting herself the target of getting fit enough to lay a trail before the end of 2016. Well, I thought, I could exercise my natural charm and get her to move her trail laying to another date. So successful was I that I found that not only would she not be date swayed, but she convinced me I would be a suitable partner to help her lay the route! The moral of this little tale is never stand in the way of a wounded Nicky.

    Thus there I was confronted by a Hasher wittering on about being in the wrong place on the wrong date, completely oblivious of the troubles I’d suffered! Whinge whinge! Serve him right if the first bit of our 5 mile trundle round Knutsford town was a really good mucky bit round the back of the Mere. The trouble is, if you’re the trail layer, you have to get mucky too. Anyway, the rest of the route was a rat’s nest of ginnels and dead end roads, which particularly proliferate on the north side of town.

    In the end nobody got lost or damaged, and the trail layers survived their own inner demons about fitness and speed re trail laying, so all went happily into the pub.

    The following week we WERE at the Penny Black, where Nick and Heather provided the steering for an excellent mixed media route around Northwich. Bits of it seemed familiar to me, and I recounted to the Dissidents, the tale of how Mr Hack and I lost each other whilst trail laying a few years ago on a bit of tonight’s route. It turned out, that Mr H and I had actually laid this particular route, aside from a couple of minor squiggles, back in 2008. In the pub Heather showed me a laminated map of our nigh on 10 year old trail, that she seems to have “acquired” somehow, and kept for all those years presumably for just this sort of occasion. No wonder bits of the trail seemed very familiar.

    What wasn’t familiar to me was the chaos that occurred at the finish of the Delamere Forest Park Run on Christmas Eve. The problem was folk couldn’t actually get over the finish line. There was such an enormous turnout that as the runners came to the end; the finishing funnel was just too small to cope with their numbers. And then the organisers ran out of the little hard plastic bar codes they give to each finisher to enable their times to be recorded. As usual I was way down the back of the field, and when I eventually crossed the line, an official told me I was 449th and would I please make sure I remembered this number. 5 minutes later as I filtered to the end of the funnel, I came across a kid of about 25 ish who’d been equipped with a makeshift recording device with which he was clearly unfamiliar. He’d been handed a piece of paper and a pen. Next to him an increasingly harassed older gentleman was trying to convince this youngster to write down the magic number each runner had been told to remember, and next to it, then put the runners own personal bar code shown on their own membership card. I know that sounds a bit complicated, but from the look of horror on the kid’s face, you’d have thought he’d been told his lucrative career as a political journalist depended on his next article convincing Nigel Farrage to support the UK’s continued membership of the EU.

    But in the end he must have mastered the delicate art of writing, as results were posted on the Park Run website. It then became apparent why the organisers were overwhelmed. They had to deal with 483 runners, 120 more than had ever turned up before. Of this total over 60 were first timers, including Graham! As I struggled up towards the finish, folk on the side of the track suddenly erupted into huge cries of encouragement for Graham, who seemed to be plodding along behind me. At the finish, as we waited for the lad to work out which end of his pen actually made marks on paper, Graham and I had a chat. It seemed this was his first run since he successfully completed the London Marathon in April. Now Graham was a generously proportioned unit, certainly a size or two larger than Martin Hack, a fact accentuated by his post Marathon inactivity which apparently had led to a stone and a bit of extra weight! But he felt the positive side of his athleticism, was as he was visiting his brother’s family for Xmas, after all this exertion none of them could deny him a significant slice of the culinary treats to follow over the next couple of days. An optimistic outlook, that boded ill for his waistline!

    Two weeks later the Park Run organisers were back on efficient form only having to cope with 316 runners. However, no less than 51 of these were first timers, a much bigger proportion than on the ill-fated Christmas Eve event. I suspect this display of athletic enthusiasm, may be because of the annual outbreak of New Year Resolutionitis. It’s always seemed a bit odd to me to have a date when we’re all supposed to announce to the world that we’re going to do, or more commonly NOT do something that will lead to us being better people. Still, that’s another tradition I suppose, although fortunately one not directly linked to Hashing.

    This year I understand a couple of our stalwarts decided that after a Graham sized gorge over the festive period, their New Year Resolution would be to have a “dry” January. A week into 2017 rumour has it that both have slightly downgraded their expectations. In one case to a status called “moist”, whilst the other has decreed a new target of “damp.” I’m not driving on Tuesday night, so I’m aiming for a target of “drunk!”

    On the first Hash of 2017, our trail layer wanted “volunteers” to come in fancy dress. In the pub afterwards Mr Ellis comfortably achieved the target I’m aiming for this coming Tuesday, by the simple expedient of drinking 2 pints of Wobbly Bob. He proudly announced to me that this ale was 6% alcohol, which means in a tad under an hour; he happily consumed about 6.5 units of booze. Impressive stuff! I suspect after downing that lot, it wouldn’t just be his Bob that was a bit Wobbly.

    And finally, there is the story of the car keys! This is a tale I’m currently doing something I very rarely do, namely plan carefully what I’m going to write. My difficulty is not making myself look quite as big a p*k as was the case. A work in progress I think!